Center for Global Studies and the Humanities

Duke University

Current Partnerships

INPUTS (Institut für postkoloniale und Transkulturelle Studien) and NiNsee (The National Institute for Dutch Slavery and its Legacy)

What Decolonials Do (HD) from rod sachs on Vimeo.

The goals of the partnership is to promote the critical role of the Humanities vis-à-vis the de-humanizing bent of economic globalization and the increasing roles of corporate values in education and in every day life. The goals of the partnership is to promote the critical role of the Humanities vis-à-vis the de-humanizing bent of economic globalization and the increasing roles of corporate values in education and in every day life. The series of workshops are part of a larger set of activities and inter-communication that contributes to orient our roles as educators and as public intellectuals and to built an international community of scholars in the social sciences and the humanities, colleagues in the professional schools, artists, activists, students. Briefly, of all those engaged in the struggle for justice and equity, denouncing abuses and exploitation and re-claiming the emancipating ideals of modernity that have been derailed by the excesses of economic gains and imperial political violence, misuses of democracy and maltreatment of human rights.

In 2006 the Center for Global Studies (CGSH) and the Humanities started a partnership with INPUTS, at the University of Bremen, Germany. The first workshop was organized by INPUTS on the topic Transcultural Humanities—Between Globalization and Post-colonial Re-reading of History, and took place in Bremen June, 16-17.

In 2007 both INPUTS and CGSH entered into a conversation with NiNsee in Amsterdam. In February of 2008 a workshop co-organized by the three entities took place Duke University, on February 21-22 on the topic, Reflections on the De-Colonial Option and the Humanities: An International Dialogue.

The third workshop co-organized between the entities took place in June of 2009, at NiNsee and the topic will be Trajectories of Emancipation: An International Symposium.

Decolonizing Knowledge

“Decolonizing Knowledge” is a Summer Seminar in Tarragona which is part of a larger intellectual and political initiative generally referred to as the “modernity/(de)coloniality research project.” A basic assumption of the project takes knowledge-making, since the European Renaissance, as a fundamental aspect of “coloniality” – the mission of saving the world by imposing an ideal model of society, of economy and of being. “Decolonizing knowledge” becomes, then, a task and a process of emancipation from assumed principles of knowledge and understanding of how the world is and should be.

The international Summer School, “Decolonizing Knowledges,” is an undertaking that aims at enlarging the scope of the conversation (analysis and investigation) of the hidden agenda of modernity (that is, coloniality) in the sphere of knowledge and higher education. Who is producing knowledge? What institutions and disciplines legitimize it? What is knowledge for, who benefits from it? Decolonizing knowledge and de-colonial thinking starts by asking basic questions about the knowledge-making itself.

Previous Partnerships

Universidad Torcuato Di Tella, Instituto Pensar, and Universidad Andina Simón Bolivar

In previous years, CGSH engaged in a three years partnership with the Universidad Torcuato Di Tella, in Buenos Aires (2001-2003). The main topic explored during three consecutive encounters and a series of publications, was the geo-politic of knowledge in relation to the increasing role of corporate values in higher education under the title “Globalization, the University and the Humanities.” During successive encounters, at the Universidad Torcuato Di Tella and at Duke, we explored issues such as the value attributed to academic and professional expertise; intellectual property rights; and the relationship between the “periphery” and “universal” history. The next joint project, entitled “The Failure of Expertise,” stemmed from debates over the financial collapse of the Argentinean national economy and the debacle caused by the downfall of Enron, as well as recent discussions of the successes and failures of medical experts.

The project has produced several publications, including the dossier “Reconfiguring the Humanities and the Social Sciences in the Age of the Global University,” edited by Grant Farred. It includes articles by Cathy Davidson, Ricardo Salvatore, Pablo G. Wright, Walter D. Mignolo, and Grant Farred, and was published in Pontificia Universidad Javeriana in Bogotá, Colombia formed a collaborative partnership among three schools: Universidad Javeriana, Duke University, and Universidad Andina Simón Bolívar. The scholars in this group shared a research interest in geopolitics of knowledge and coloniality of power. The group met three times: an initial meeting in Bogotá in May of 1999, a follow-up encounter at Duke University in November of the same year, and a final meeting in Quito in June 2001. This three-year interaction ultimately produced the book Indisciplinar las ciencias sociales: Geopolíticas del conocimiento y colonialidad del poder, published in Quito in 2002 by Universidad Andina and Abya Yala. The volume was co-edited by Catherine Walsh (Universidad Andina), Santiago Castro-Gómez (Universidad Javeriana) and Freya Schiwy (Duke University).

About Our Partnerships

  • In previous years, CGSH engaged in a three years partnership with the Universidad Torcuato Di Tella, in Buenos Aires (2001-2003). The main topic explored during three consecutive encounters and a series of publications, was the geo-politic of knowledge in relation to the increasing role of corporate values in higher education under the title “Globalization, the University and the Humanities.” During successive encounters, at the Universidad Torcuato Di Tella and at Duke, we explored issues such as the value attributed to academic and professional expertise; intellectual property rights; and the relationship between the “periphery” and “universal” history. The next joint project, entitled “The Failure of Expertise,” stemmed from debates over the financial collapse of the Argentinean national economy and the debacle caused by the downfall of Enron, as well as recent discussions of the successes and failures of medical experts.

    The project has produced several publications, including the dossier “Reconfiguring the Humanities and the Social Sciences in the Age of the Global University,” edited by Grant Farred. It includes articles by Cathy Davidson, Ricardo Salvatore, Pablo G. Wright, Walter D. Mignolo, and Grant Farred, and was published in Pontificia Universidad Javeriana in Bogotá, Colombia formed a collaborative partnership among three schools: Universidad Javeriana, Duke University, and Universidad Andina Simón Bolívar. The scholars in this group shared a research interest in geopolitics of knowledge and coloniality of power. The group met three times: an initial meeting in Bogotá in May of 1999, a follow-up encounter at Duke University in November of the same year, and a final meeting in Quito in June 2001. This three-year interaction ultimately produced the book Indisciplinar las ciencias sociales: Geopolíticas del conocimiento y colonialidad del poder, published in Quito in 2002 by Universidad Andina and Abya Yala. The volume was co-edited by Catherine Walsh (Universidad Andina), Santiago Castro-Gómez (Universidad Javeriana) and Freya Schiwy (Duke University).